Post Tagged with: "history"

Australian ornithologists in Siberia

Australian ornithologists in Siberia

April 28, 2017

People & professions, Such was life:

In 1903 the Australian ornithologist Robert Hall (1867-1949) embarked on his major expedition to Siberia (via Japan and Korea), to collect specimens and eggs of Siberian birds known to migrate… Read More ›

“Kick it to Hunter, the screw kick punter!”

“Kick it to Hunter, the screw kick punter!”

April 13, 2017

Our stories:

Bill Hunter has been researching his grandfather, Fred Hunter, a star footballer in the Healesville area for many years from the early 1900s. Bill believes that it was Fred who perfected what is now known as the banana kick, a kick for goal from an impossible angle that screws at right angles. Fred’s father, Richard Rowan, developed the kick in the 1890s, and Fred perfected it during his playing days to the point where fans exhorted the team to “Kick it to Hunter, the screw kick punter!”

The owl and the heiress: The life of one book over six centuries

The owl and the heiress: The life of one book over six centuries

March 29, 2017

Arts & literature, Our stories:

What do Athena’s little owl, an unashamedly unmarried Chicago heiress, and the Heide School of modernist Australian artists have in common? A book in our collection, as it turns out… Recently I… Read More ›

Cloud watching: how we came to understand the weather

Cloud watching: how we came to understand the weather

March 23, 2017

Our stories:

People love talking about the weather. How many times have you heard someone say “Crazy weather we’re having, hey?” in the past week (or said it yourself)?

Vivian Bullwinkel far right at the Australian General Hospital, ca. 1945. Source.

8 women from Australia’s history you should know

March 8, 2017

Our stories:

The effect Australia’s women have had on our country is undeniable yet oft-forgotten. That’s why we’re taking March—Women’s History Month—to look back and share the stories of women from our past.

The erasure of Melbourne’s wetlands

The erasure of Melbourne’s wetlands

August 29, 2016

Buildings & streets, Cities & towns, Such was life:

Creative fellow and author, Dr David Sornig, shows us how the library’s maps and manuscripts chart the demise of West Melbourne’s wetlands in his special guest blog this week. Welcome David.

New display opens to commemorate Ireland’s 1916 Easter Rising

New display opens to commemorate Ireland’s 1916 Easter Rising

March 17, 2016

News:

Ireland’s 1916 Easter Rising was a pivotal moment in the Irish struggle for independence from Great Britain, that would have far-reaching repercussions here in Australia.

State Library celebrates 160 years of serving Victoria

State Library celebrates 160 years of serving Victoria

February 11, 2016

News:

Today State Library Victoria celebrates 160 years since first opening to the public on 11 February 1856. It is Australia’s oldest free public library and the nation’s busiest with nearly 1.8 million visitors a year.

Joan of Arc / Jeanne d’Arc, Emmanuel Frémiet (1824-1910)

Melbourne’s Joan of Arc

February 1, 2016

Our stories:

Melbourne’s Maid of Orléans arrived at Port Melbourne from Marseilles on 28 January 1907. Here, Pictures Librarian Gerard Hayes traces Joan’s history from a Francophile rallying point to the mysterious case of a missing crown.

King Charles on the scaffold, bound in copy of King Charls his speech made upon the scaffold London, 1649

The trial and execution of a King

January 29, 2016

Our stories:

The Library holds some of the earliest printed accounts of the trial and execution King Charles I. The pamphlets are part of the Emmerson collection, one of the great private libraries of early English books in the world.