Post Tagged with: "WWI"

Pigeon messengers of World War I

Pigeon messengers of World War I

July 22, 2021

Ask a librarian, Collection spotlights, Our stories:

It may be hard to believe today, but the humble pigeon played a heroic role as messenger in World War I, braving heavy artillery fire and poisonous gas to deliver messages between the front line and headquarters.

Voices from the Great War

Voices from the Great War

June 30, 2021

Ask a librarian, Collection spotlights:

Our Library has a vast collection of material relating to World War 1 including many original diaries and photographs. Two notable diaries were written by (Victor) Rupert Laidlaw and Alice Kitchin. Both were eyewitnesses to history and their diaries speak eloquently of their experiences, and reflect the horrors of the conflict.

Discovering Diener’s Ice Works: part two

Discovering Diener’s Ice Works: part two

June 21, 2020

Buildings & streets, People & professions, Research guides, Research tips & tricks, Social life & customs, Such was life, War:

The second and final part of a blog about flâneurs and research in the time of covid-19 As you can read in part one, this blog was inspired by daily… Read More ›

Discovering Diener’s Ice Works: part one

Discovering Diener’s Ice Works: part one

June 8, 2020

Buildings & streets, People & professions, Research guides, Research tips & tricks, Social life & customs, Such was life, War:

This is the first of a two-part blog about flâneurs and research in the time of covid-19 A daily walk has become an essential part of many people’s routines in… Read More ›

Five splendid workers of No 8 General, c 1917,  Traill is second from the right, MS 7975

Jessie Traill: An artist at war

November 29, 2018

Our stories, War:

During World War I Jessie Traill spent five years serving as a British Voluntary Aid Detachment. Her war experience is recorded through photographs, sketches, written accounts and letters to friends.

Remembering the Armistice, 100 years on

Remembering the Armistice, 100 years on

November 9, 2018

Our stories, War:

Guns on the Western Front fell silent one hundred years ago, at 11am on 11 November 1918, bringing to an end what we remember as the First World War. 

Armistice Day, corner of Collins and Swanston Streets, Melbourne 1918

Armistice Day captured in WWI diary

October 31, 2018

Our stories:

With the announcement of the World War I armistice on 11 November 1918, many soldiers felt both joy and disbelief. Stretcher-bearer Percy Samson captured it in his diary.

The first day of the Battle of the Somme

The first day of the Battle of the Somme

June 30, 2016

Our stories:

This day saw the British Army experience the single bloodiest day in its entire history, with close to 60,000 casualties, as Lord Kitchener’s inexperienced new recruits came face to face with the brutal realities of modern warfare’s industrialised killing.

Ballarat Star, 10 July 1920

Post war play creates furore in Bendigo

June 21, 2016

Our stories:

On Saturday 3 July 1920, the play Advance Australia was staged at the Princess Theatre in Bendigo. Written by a local Catholic priest, John Joseph Kennedy, it would create a national furore.

[Nurse in walking out outfit, Egypt] 
Accession no: H2011.36/48

No damned females! Exploring WW1 nursing records with Dr Kirsty Harris.

October 22, 2015

Family History Feast 2015, Family matters:

“No damned female M.O.s in the A.I.F. My responsibilities are quite big enough with 1200 nurses” responded General Neville Howse to the suggestion that female doctors should be allowed to serve with the AIF.