Family matters

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Welfare records at the State Library

August 19, 2021

Family matters, Research tips & tricks:

Welfare records can be a great tool for a family historian! This blog explores the welfare collections held at the State Library, including the Melbourne Benevolent Asylum, Melbourne Orphan Asylum, Gordon Homes for Boys and Girls and more

Chinese and Miners on the Way to the Diggings.

Researching your Chinese Victorian ancestors

August 5, 2021

Family matters, Research tips & tricks:

In the mid 19th century, a wave of Chinese migrants came to Australia in search of prosperity. By 1861, over 24,000 Chinese individuals were living in Victoria . Many resided… Read More ›

Portrait of an unidentified young woman, photograph by Louis Grouzelle, (between 1880 and 1890?]

Who’s that girl? Dating a 19th century photograph

July 28, 2021

Family matters, Research tips & tricks:

When browsing through collections of old family photographs it’s not unusual to come across images of unknown people and places. But how do you discover who these nameless ancestors are?

One method is to work out when the photograph was taken – once you have a rough time frame, you can compare the details of the sitter to ancestors in your family tree and hopefully find a match. This can be a complicated task, but every family historian likes a good challenge!

Catalogue upgrade: QR codes and search suggestions

Catalogue upgrade: QR codes and search suggestions

July 1, 2021

Ask a librarian, Research tips & tricks, Tips and tricks:

Create QR codes, see recent search suggestions and view up 50 results at a time with these new features recently added to the Library catalogue.

An ‘ordinary great woman’: Anna Vroland

An ‘ordinary great woman’: Anna Vroland

March 31, 2021

Family matters:

Upon her death in 1978, Victorian woman Anna Fellowes Vroland (1902-1978) was described by a colleague as being ‘one of the ordinary great women of our time’. Anna was a school teacher, writer, radio commentator, and political activist in the areas of Aboriginal rights, women’s rights and the peace movement. She held many views that seem entirely contemporary, but were not at all commonplace at the time she aired them. 

Large suspension formation by members of the Ebenezer Gym Club

Sporting days – how to research your sporting ancestors

February 3, 2021

Family matters, Research tips & tricks:

Sport is a huge part of community life and sporting club records can provide another dimension to your family history. They can help to locate a person in a place,… Read More ›

There’s more to the roll! Part 2. Commonwealth electoral rolls, post-federation years

There’s more to the roll! Part 2. Commonwealth electoral rolls, post-federation years

January 28, 2021

Family matters, Research tips & tricks:

Federal electoral rolls are used extensively by family historians, helping us to piece together the lives of our families. But sometimes our forebears are not listed on these rolls –… Read More ›

There’s more to the roll! Part 1. Victorian electoral rolls, pre-federation years

There’s more to the roll! Part 1. Victorian electoral rolls, pre-federation years

January 12, 2021

Family matters, Research tips & tricks:

Australian electoral rolls contain minimal information, yet they are one of the most valuable and frequently used resources by family historians, who use them extensively to trace the whereabouts of people over… Read More ›

‘Behind the Paint’, Shannyn Higgins’ vibrant portraits of street artists

‘Behind the Paint’, Shannyn Higgins’ vibrant portraits of street artists

November 30, 2020

Collections:

In November 2020, the Library acquired a portrait series title Behind the Paint featuring some of Melbourne’s most iconic artists, alongside their work, shot by photographer Shannyn Higgins.

The Wonthaggi Coal Mine

The Wonthaggi Coal Mine

November 26, 2020

Family matters, Research tips & tricks:

Opening in 1910, the mine was intended to deliver a reliable coal supply for the Victorian Railways. With a reputation as one of the most dangerous mines in the country, over 80 men lost their lives during its operation.